Salmon Kasujiru Recipe (Savory and Nutritious Sake Lees Soup with Salmon and Vegetables)

Salmon Kasujiru is a hot pot using sake kasu or sake lees, a by-product of sake making. The sake kasu is full of savory taste and the salmon and vegetables also bring out the flavor of the broth. This dish will warm you from the inside out!

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Salmon Kasujiru
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Course Soup
Cuisine Japanese
Servings
people
Ingredients
  • 2 Lightly Salted Salmon Fillet 160g/5.6 oz for 2 people
  • 100 g Daikon Radish cut into 5mm/0.2" thick quarter moons
  • 50 g Carrots cut into 5mm/0.2" thick half moons
  • 1/2 Konjac 100g/3.5 oz for 2 people
  • 1 Aburaage thin deep-fried tofu
  • 1/2 Long Green Onion white part, cut into 1cm/0.4" thick diagonal slices
  • 600 ml Dashi Stock
  • 1 1/2 tbsp Miso
  • 80 g Sake Kasu sake lees
  • 1 Spring Onion Leaf shredded diagonally
Course Soup
Cuisine Japanese
Servings
people
Ingredients
  • 2 Lightly Salted Salmon Fillet 160g/5.6 oz for 2 people
  • 100 g Daikon Radish cut into 5mm/0.2" thick quarter moons
  • 50 g Carrots cut into 5mm/0.2" thick half moons
  • 1/2 Konjac 100g/3.5 oz for 2 people
  • 1 Aburaage thin deep-fried tofu
  • 1/2 Long Green Onion white part, cut into 1cm/0.4" thick diagonal slices
  • 600 ml Dashi Stock
  • 1 1/2 tbsp Miso
  • 80 g Sake Kasu sake lees
  • 1 Spring Onion Leaf shredded diagonally
Votes: 0
Rating: 0
You:
Rate this recipe!
Instructions
  1. First, cut the lightly salted salmon fillets into bite-size pieces. You can also use yellowtail instead of the salmon.
  2. Place the salmon into a pot of boiling water.
  3. When the surface turns slightly white, remove and place the pieces into a bowl of cold water. Rinse the salmon thoroughly and carefully remove the scales.
  4. Place the pieces onto a mesh strainer covered with a paper towel. This process will remove any unwanted flavor.
  5. Next, using a paper towel, remove the excess oil of the aburaage, thin deep-fried tofu.
  6. Cut the aburaage in half lengthwise. Stack the halves on top of each other and cut the aburaage into 1cm (0.4") pieces. After cutting the aburaage, be sure to clean the oil from the cutting board and the blade of the knife.
  7. Shred the spring onion leaf diagonally. The cuts look like the shape of bamboo leaves, making it visually appealing.
  8. As for the konjac, divide it into bite-size pieces using a spoon. The uneven cuts will help the konjac to absorb the broth later.
  9. Place the konjac into a pot of water and bring it to a boil. Boil the konjac for about 30 seconds. This will also help reduce any unwanted flavor.
  10. Remove and place it into a mesh strainer.
  11. Let's make the Kasujiru. Place the dashi stock in a pot and add the daikon radish and carrot.
  12. Add the konjac, aburaage and salmon.
  13. Heat the pot on medium heat. Cover but leave the lid slightly open to prevent the broth from developing any fishy odor.
  14. Bring it to a boil and remove the foam.
  15. Next, add a small amount of the broth to the sake kasu or sake lees, a nutritious by-product of sake making. Cover the pot again and cook on medium low heat.
  16. Meanwhile, dilute the sake kasu evenly with a balloon whisk. Add the miso and combine the mixture.
  17. After simmering for a total of 12 to 13 minutes, the vegetables will soften. Now, place the sake kasu and miso mixture into a mesh strainer. And press it through the strainer.
  18. The mixture will also dissolve in the broth while simmering so it is not necessary to remove the lumps completely. Distribute the sake kasu and miso.
  19. Add the white part of the long green onion sliced diagonally. Then, simmer for 3 to 5 more minutes until the long green onion softens.
  20. Now, it is ready. Ladle all the ingredients into a bowl along with the broth.
  21. Garnish with the spring onion leaves. Finally, sprinkle on the shichimi chili powder.
Recipe Notes
  • Depending on the saltiness of the salmon and the type of miso, the overall flavor of this dish will change so be sure to try the broth and adjust the amount of miso accordingly.
  • We recommend dissolving the sake kasu with the hot broth instead of hot water. This will avoid diluting the delicious soup.
  • As for the alternative vegetables, burdock root and taro go great with this dish.
  • Simmering the sake kasu will make the broth thick so this is a perfect dish especially on cold days.


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Cooking with Dog

Cooking with Dog is a YouTube cooking show featured by a canine host Francis and a mysterious Japanese Chef whose real name is not disclosed. クッキングウィズドッグはホスト犬フランシスと謎の女性シェフが出演するYouTubeチャンネルです。

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