Sata Andagi Recipe (Okinawan Donuts)

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We are making Sata Andagi, sweet and delicious Okinawan donuts. The outside is crispy and the inside is soft. Fresh ones are especially delicious!

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Sata Andagi (Okinawan Donuts)
Votes: 16
Rating: 3.94
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Course Dessert
Cuisine Japanese
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings
pieces (approx.)
Translator Get Francis Mug
Course Dessert
Cuisine Japanese
Cook Time 15 minutes
Servings
pieces (approx.)
Translator Get Francis Mug
Votes: 16
Rating: 3.94
You:
Please leave a 5 star rating if you like the recipe! 🙂
Add to Meal Plan
Add to Meal Plan:
This recipe has been added to your Meal Plan
Ingredients
* 1 tablespoon (tbsp) = 15 ml, 1 teaspoon (tsp) = 5 ml
* The ingredients contain Amazon affiliate links.
Instructions
  1. First, let’s make the dough. Beat the egg in a bowl. Add the sugar.
    First, let’s make the dough. Beat the egg in a bowl. Add the sugar.
  2. Thoroughly mix together.
    Thoroughly mix together.
  3. Add the vegetable oil and mix again.
    Add the vegetable oil and mix again.
  4. Next, combine the cake flour and the baking powder. Mix the powder in a bowl. Then, sieve the powder into the bowl of the egg mixture.
    Next, combine the cake flour and the baking powder. Mix the powder in a bowl. Then, sieve the powder into the bowl of the egg mixture.
  5. We recommend using cake flour in this recipe to help create a soft texture but you can also use all purpose flour instead.
    We recommend using cake flour in this recipe to help create a soft texture but you can also use all purpose flour instead.
  6. Now, using a paddle, combine the ingredients with a slashing motion. Avoid over-mixing otherwise the soft texture will be lost when deep-fried.
    Now, using a paddle, combine the ingredients with a slashing motion. Avoid over-mixing otherwise the soft texture will be lost when deep-fried.
  7. Then, fold the dough until all the flour is mixed in. Now, the dough is ready.
    Then, fold the dough until all the flour is mixed in. Now, the dough is ready.
  8. And now, let’s deep-fry the sata andagi. Heat the oil to 150°C (302°F), which is a relatively low temperature for deep-frying. Small bubbles should slightly form around the tip of the chopsticks.
    And now, let’s deep-fry the sata andagi. Heat the oil to 150°C (302°F), which is a relatively low temperature for deep-frying. Small bubbles should slightly form around the tip of the chopsticks.
  9. Wet your hands with vegetable oil and spoon the dough onto your hand.
    Wet your hands with vegetable oil and spoon the dough onto your hand.
  10. Shape it into a ball about the size of a ping pong ball.
    Shape it into a ball about the size of a ping pong ball.
  11. Gently place the dough pieces into a pot and slowly deep-fry them at a low temperature. You’ll have about 10 dough pieces in total but today, we will only cook 5 of them.
    Gently place the dough pieces into a pot and slowly deep-fry them at a low temperature. You’ll have about 10 dough pieces in total but today, we will only cook 5 of them.
  12. The dough will turn by itself so disturb it as little as possible otherwise it’ll be less likely to have its signature cracks.
    The dough will turn by itself so disturb it as little as possible otherwise it’ll be less likely to have its signature cracks.
  13. Sata means ‘sugar’, anda means ‘oil’ and agi means ‘deep-fry’ in the Okinawan dialect, which is why the snack is called Sata Andagi.
    Sata means ‘sugar’, anda means ‘oil’ and agi means ‘deep-fry’ in the Okinawan dialect, which is why the snack is called Sata Andagi.
  14. It’s smiling! The expression ‘sata andagi smiles’ refers to the cracks on its surface because the cracks look like the shape of smile.
    It’s smiling! The expression ‘sata andagi smiles’ refers to the cracks on its surface because the cracks look like the shape of smile.
  15. Now, they are ready.
    Now, they are ready.
  16. Remove the donuts and place them onto a tray covered with a paper towel.
    Remove the donuts and place them onto a tray covered with a paper towel.
  17. Arrange the sata andagi on a plate.
    Arrange the sata andagi on a plate.
Recipe Notes

If your andagi doesn’t smile, it is probably caused by the following reasons. The oil temperature is too high, the dough is too runny or it is moved too much while cooking.
Sata Andagi is also known as Sato Tempura, meaning ‘sugar tempura’ since the dough has a relatively large amount of sugar.

Cooking with Dog

Cooking with Dog is a YouTube cooking show featured by a canine host Francis and a mysterious Japanese Chef whose real name is not disclosed.
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E.M. van der Graaf

Hi, how are you? I love your show, it’s inspiration and also I make some of the recipes. I was wondering by Sata Andagi which sugar you used? Was it white sugar or crystal sugar or brown sugar? I loved to make this at home for holidays. Thank you.